Posts Tagged ‘vSphere’

Veeam Backup vs PHDvirtual Backup part 1- Introduction

For a long time I have been a fan of PHDvirtual (formerly esXpress) and their way of backing up virtual environments. Their lack of ESXi support has driven a lot of people towards other vendors, and the one that is really on technology’s edge nowadays is Veeam’s Backup and Replication. Now that PHDvirtual has released their version 5.1 with ESXi support, it is high time for a shootout between the two.

Some history on drawing virtual backups

In the old ESX 3.0 and ESX 3.5 days, there was hardly any integration with 3rd party backup products. Read the rest of this entry »

Veeam Backup part 3- Final fiddling on target storage

Just when I thought I had done a pretty complete tuneup on the storage path from Veeam backup to an Iomega IX2-200 NAS, two things came up I wanted to test. The first one (why didn’t I think of that) is to set compression to “low”, saving CPU cycles and hopefully getting more throughput. The second one was starting a second job on the same Veeam VM to the same target storage.

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Veeam Backup part 1- Optimizing IX2-200 backup speeds

Thanks to Veeam’s Happy Holidays gift, I now have a license for several Veeam products. The one I really wanted to try in my home lab was Veeam Backup and Replication.

In this blogpost, I will try various ways to connect the Veeam appliance to my Iomega IX2-200 NAS box. This setup is very tiny indeed, but it clearly shows the options you have and how they perform compared to each other. Read the rest of this entry »

Workaround: ESXi and EMC CLARiiON registration issue

The issue mentioned in one of my previous blogposts (see ESXi and EMC CLARiiON registration issue) now has a workaround! The problem is that the host profiles of vSphere mix up the vmk0 and vmk1 interfaces, after which the CLARiiON tries to communicate through the wrong VMkernel interface with ESXi.

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vscsiStats 3D surface graph part 3: Build your own!

Some people have asked me how to actually create the 3D graphs from the vcsiStats tool. I use a simple Excel sheet for this. Using the script I described in vscsiStats into the third dimension: Surface charts! , you can import the files outputted into excel and see the Excel chart instantaneously.

The vscsiStats tool is a very powerfull vSphere utility. It allows you to see virtual disk performance (such as latency, IOPS block sizes etc). The script I used in part 1 and in part 2 of this series will shoot multiple samples of these values right after each other, which you can then import into Excel to produce surface charts, like this one:

3D surface chart example from the vscsiStats tool

How to create graphs like this is described in detail below. Read the rest of this entry »

The Elusive Miss Alignment


Is it a new miss election?? Well, after doing more than a little testing I figured out I may be MISSing something… So unfortunately it is not about beautiful women, but yet another technical deepdive. This time into misalignment. Theoretically it is SO easy to point out what the problem is (see Throughput part 3: Data alignment. For this new blog entry I had my mind set on showing the differences between misalignment and alignment in the lab… However this proves to be much MUCH harder than anticipated…

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Rid yourself of superfluous vCenter datastore alarms

New and improved in vSphere: Datastore alarms. Very nice to have, but some of these alarms are so generic, that datastores are simply always in an alarmed state. Errors like “non-VI workload detected” on your ISO LUN, “Datastore usage on disk” and so on. Here’s how to loose these errors on certain stores while enforcing them on others.

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Windows XP virtualized – Which disk controller?

Amongst many of the optimizations for virtual desktops, it is always stated that the LSI Logic virtual disk controller is faster/more efficient than the BusLogic controller. So is this really true in vSphere 4.1 environments?

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PHD Virtual Backup 5.1er – First Impressions

Today I got my hands on the new PHD Virtual Backup Appliance – version 5.1-ER. Following in the footsteps of its XenServer brother, this new version uses a single VBA (versus the previous versions where multiple VBA’s were used). Best of all: ESXi support at last!

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Surviving SAN failure – Revisited (vSphere)

Some time ago I posted Surviving total SAN failure which I had tested on ESX 3.5 at the time. A recent commenter had trouble getting this to work on a vSphere 4.0 environment. So I set out to test this once more on my trusty vSphere 4.1 environment.

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